About

Josh May

Josh May's Curriculum Vitae

I’m an ethicist and cognitive scientist (officially, Associate Professor of Philosophy) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. After finishing my PhD in 2011 at beautiful UC Santa Barbara, I was fortunate to have taught for two years in a land down under at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. From 2020-2022, I was on an Academic Cross-Training Fellowship, which relieved me from teaching while I studied neuroscience. When not reading, writing, or teaching, I like to get away from the computer and hike, climb, travel, play guitar, look at birds, cook mostly vegetarian food, or spend time with my wonderful daughter.

icon-rsrchMost of my research lies at the intersection of ethics and science (e.g. neuroethics) and aims to understand the development, breakdown, and improvement of moral character. My book Regard for Reason in the Moral Mind (Oxford University Press, 2018) draws on scientific evidence to show that reasoning plays a fundamental role in ethical thought and action. Articles of mine have appeared in the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Behavioral & Brain SciencesCognitionJournal of Medical Ethics, Mind & Language, Neuroethics, Philosophical Studies, and SyntheseRead more…

icon-teachI teach a range of philosophy courses, but my regulars are Contemporary Moral IssuesIntro to PhilosophyBioethicsEthics: Theories of Good and Evil, and Neuroethics. I occasionally teach seminars, which usually cover current debates in these areas. In 2017, I was honored to receive the Outstanding Professor Award from the students in UAB’s Early Medical School Acceptance ProgramRead more…

icon-otherOther professional activities have included serving on the editorial board for Philosophical Psychology, working with the Society for Philosophy and Psychology (as well as the Southern SPP), coaching UAB’s ethics debate team, and assisting with the Internet Encyclopedia of PhilosophyRead more…

icon-mediaPhilosophy is for everyone, so I am increasingly making efforts to discuss ethical issues in public forums, through opinion pieces, interviews, and blog postsRead more…